Week of August 3 on Native America Calling

Monday, August 3, 2015 – Midwives in Native America

Who was there when you were born? Usually, there are doctors – and maybe a midwife – at every birth in America. On this program, we explore Native views on birth and midwifery. We will also examine issues and trends for midwives who work in Native communities. Guests include Nicolle L. Gonzales (Diné), certified nurse-midwife and founder of The Changing Woman Initiative.

 

Tuesday, August 4, 2015 – Dementia in Native America

American Indians in Northern California have a 5 percent higher rate of dementia, according to long-term study conducted by Kaiser Permanente and the University of California. Additional research is needed to learn more about dementia in our communities. What are the risk factors for dementia? Can dementia be prevented? Having a family member with dementia can be a challenging and stressful experience, but resources are available for family members and caregivers. Join our conversation and share your experiences and advice. Guests: Dr. Heather Snyder – director of medical and scientific operations at the Alzheimer’s Association.

 

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 – Effects of Climate Change on Native American Culture and Tradition

Climate change is already causing sea level rises, drought and severe weather and Native communities are seeing the impact of those changes. In February, the U.S. Department of Interior allocated $8 million for tribal climate change adaptation and planning projects. Beyond the physical and economical damages, what changes in the climate affect Native ceremonies, traditional foods and cultural happenings?

 

Thursday, August 6, 2015 – The Stigma of Mental Illness

American Indian and Alaska Native adults have the highest prevalence of mental illness, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Recent violent tragedies in the news have sparked a new conversation about mental health in the United States. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experience some type of mental health event each year. Talking about mental health isn’t always easy. It not be a common conversation around the dinner table, but are adults seeking the treatment they need? What can be done to eliminate the stigma associated with mental illness? Guests: Dr. Art Martinez (Chumash) – clinical psychologist at the Shingle Springs Tribal Health Program.

 

Friday, August 7, 2015 – Preparing for College

According to the National Indian Education Association, 39% of American Indian/Alaska Native students who started in 2005 as first-time, full-time students at 4-year institutions graduated within 6 years. In the same time period, 60% of white students graduated. How can we better prepare Native students for the first day of college? Join our conversation with Native student success centers for tips on how to tackle your first years of college. Guests:

Pamela Agoyo (Cochiti, Kewa, Ohkay Owingeh Pueblos) director of American Indian Student Services at the University of New Mexico, Layton Lamsam (Osage), 2nd year Medical Student at Stanford University, and Victoria LaPoe (Cherokee),  a professor of broadcast and film at Western Kentucky University.

 

 

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Lightning fires located on Mendocino National Forest

U.S. Forest Service
Mendocino National Forest
825 N. Humboldt Ave.
Willows, CA 95988

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 31, 2015

Lightning fires located on Mendocino National Forest

WILLOWS, Calif. – The Mendocino National Forest is currently locating and taking actions to suppress fires started by lightning yesterday.

The Forest received more than 100 lightning strikes Thursday afternoon and evening across the forest.

Since yesterday, the Forest has identified 10 fires, with most of them on the west side on the Upper Lake and Covelo Ranger Districts.  The Grindstone Ranger District currently has one fire estimated to be a half acre.

Eight of the remaining fires are small – ranging in size from a single tree to 2 acres.  Progress towards containment is being made on the fires.

The Etsel Fire on the Upper Lake Ranger District is the largest fire, estimated to be between 35 and 40 acres.  It is located in the Yuki Wilderness and is burning in heavy timber and brush.

As dry conditions and hot temperatures continue, firefighters anticipate discovering more lightning fires in coming days.  There is also a chance of thunderstorms this afternoon and evening.

Forest visitors are asked to be aware of their surroundings and be prepared for changing conditions.  This includes reporting visible smoke that could be from a wildfire.

To report a fire, please call 911.

As a reminder, the Mendocino National Forest is currently under fire restrictions.  Visitors are asked to follow regulations and be careful with anything with a flame or that can throw a spark in the forest.  For more information, please visit www.preventwildfireca.org/OneLessSpark/.

For more information, please contact the Mendocino National Forest at 530-934-3316 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/mendocino. Updates are also available on Twitter @MendocinoNF.

Need to Weed! The Yuki Trails Community Garden

Need to Weed!
The Yuki Trails Community Garden needs friends to come and pull some weeds. Five minutes would make a difference; they are growing fast and greedy around the drip irrigation lines. The weeds pull up easily and can be left along side of the row, or simply chopped down with a hoe. Come by anytime, the garden gate is unlocked, just walk right in!
The parking lot is open Monday – Friday, closed at night and on weekends.

“Women Artists of Covelo” opens Aug. 7 at the Arts Council of Mendocino County in Ukiah

“Women Artists of Covelo” opens Aug. 7 at the Arts Council of Mendocino County in Ukiah


“Lucy Young,” by Lila James. Contributed
Curators Christiane Esparza and Jenn Procacci at the Depot on East Perkins Street. Contributed

The Arts Council of Mendocino County will be presenting “Women Artists of Covelo,” a multi-media art exhibit that opens Aug. 7, as part of the First Friday Art Walk, at the historic railroad depot at 309 E. Perkins St. in Ukiah, from 5 to 8 p.m.

The exhibit features the work of 16 artists, all female residents of Covelo, ranging in age from 12 to 80-plus. The work was selected from a slightly larger annual exhibit, now in its fourth year, of Covelo women’s artwork shown each year in Covelo at the Library Commons. This is, however, the first time the exhibit will travel outside of Covelo.

Both of these exhibits were curated by participating artists Christiane Esparza and Jenn Procacci. The idea to exhibit the work in Ukiah emerged through a conversation between Alyssum Wier, executive director of the Arts Council of Mendocino County, and Jenn Procacci, artist and Covelo resident, when Alyssum was observing an art class at Round Valley Middle School as part of the Arts Council’s Get Arts in the Schools Program.

Since that conversation, Procacci has become a member of the Arts Council’s board of directors, and was instrumental in enlisting artists to participate in the current exhibit.

Lila James, one of the elder artists in the exhibit, is entirely self-taught. According to the curators, this is the first time that James has ever exhibited her work outside of Covelo.

Arts Council Executive Director Alyssum Wier states: “I am incredibly inspired by the artistic talent found throughout Mendocino County. The Arts Council is always looking for ways to make this ‘natural resource’ more visible, and to increase economic and publicity opportunities for artists. I hope a lot of people will come to see this exhibit. Covelo art will knock your socks off!”

Participating artists are: Carol Borden, Leslie Cardone, Jubilee Dess, Christiane Esparza, Rainbow Ganges, Donna Guzzetta, Lila James, Isabelle LeMieux and Mirabelle LeMieux, Katie Margerison, Jenn Procacci, Sage Roseberry, Angela Vincent, Marjo Wilson, Barbara Wyre and Lynn Zachreson.

The Arts Council of Mendocino County, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, promotes the arts and cultivates creativity to benefit and enrich the lives of residents and visitors of Mendocino County. The two largest programs of the Arts Council are the Get Arts in the Schools Program, and the highly popular online, printed and emailed calendars of art events. More resources can be found at www.ArtsMendocino.org.

Mendocino County Hosts HHSA Animal Care-a-Van Vaccination Day in Laytonville

Press Release

Date: July 28, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Dora Briley, HHSA Communications

Mendocino County Hosts HHSA Animal Care-a-Van Vaccination Day in Laytonville

Earlier in July, a cat in the Fort Bragg area tested positive for Rabies.  While it is the first animal testing positive in Mendocino County since 2012, it does highlight the need to educate pet owners on the need for current vaccinations of their pets.

To help Mendocino County residents with vaccinating their pets, their cats in particular, the Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) Animal Care Services (ACS) is bringing the Care-a-Van to Laytonville with low cost vaccines for cats and dogs.

The Care-a-Van will be at the Laytonville Feed Store located at 400 Branscomb Road on Sunday, August 2, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  Rabies vaccines will be at a fabulous price of $6.00 per shot for either cats or dogs.  Other vaccines will be available at $13.00 per shot.

In addition there will be a limited number of spay and neuter appointments available but you must call to reserve an appointment.  Contact the shelter at 707-888-7698.

HHSA is proud to serve the community with the Care-a-Van outreach services, especially with prevention services to keep our pets healthy and happy!

For more information you may call the HHSA Animal Care Shelter at 707-463-4654.

Mendocino County Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) Forum for Children & Families, Youth & Transitional Age Youth, Adults & Older Adults

Press Release

Date: July 24, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Mendocino County Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) Forum for Children & Families, Youth & Transitional Age Youth, Adults & Older Adults

 The Mendocino County Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) Forum will be held on Wednesday, July 29, 2015, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon in Point Arena.

This meeting will take place at the Point Arena Library located at 225 Main St. in Point Arena.

This meeting is similar to a town meeting where members of the public, consumers and family members, MHSA stakeholders and community agencies are encouraged to attend to provide suggestions, ideas and feedback on the Mental Health Services Act programs.

Meeting agendas are published at:http://www.co.mendocino.ca.us/hhsa/mhsa.htm

For further information, contact: Robin Meloche, MHSA Coordinator at 707-472-2332.

# #

VOLUNTEERS WANTED TO HELP SUPPRESS GANG GRAFFITI

MENDOCINO SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY

JULY 22, 2015

VOLUNTEERS WANTED TO HELP SUPPRESS GANG GRAFFITI

Free paint and supplies are available to citizens who want to volunteer to help stop gang graffiti.

“The key to graffiti prevention is rapid response,” said Mike Sweeney of the Mendocino Solid Waste Management Authority.  “If the gangsters’ scrawls don’t last, they won’t bother to make them.”

The Solid Waste Authority at 468-9710 responds whenever it learns of gang graffiti, but often there is a delay of days or weeks before that happens.   “We need volunteers who care about the appearance of our communities to lend a hand so the gang graffiti can be erased the same day it appears,” said Sweeney.

The Solid Waste Authority will supply free paint and rollers upon request to any volunteer who is willing to take responsibility for graffiti abatement in their neighborhood.

Most gang graffiti appears on utility boxes, public spaces, or vacant buildings, and volunteers should feel free to paint it over immediately, said Sweeney.   If graffiti appears on a store or other private property, permission should be requested from the owner before painting.   If a property owner fails to respond, the Solid Waste Authority should be contacted because it has the power under County Code to take immediate summary abatement action.

The Solid Waste Authority has a special solvent that can remove graffiti without painting if the surface is smooth and impervious.

Gang graffiti is more than a problem of aesthetics.   Police consider it a public safety threat because it encourages gang activity and gang rivalries.   Mendocino County Code Section 8.200.030 states that no property owner “shall allow or permit any graffiti to remain on any permanent structure located on such property when the graffiti is visible from the street or other public or private property.”

Ceremony and Demonstration to Be Held on Caltrans’ Willits Bypass Mitigation Lands to Protect Native American Sites

Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians
Save Our Little Lake Valley
Earth First!
Bay Area Coalition for Headwaters
For immediate release

Ceremony and Demonstration to Be Held on Caltrans’ Willits Bypass Mitigation Lands to Protect Native American Sites

A prayer ceremony will be held today, July 23, at 10:00 a.m., at a site just off highway 101, north of Willits, where the northern interchange of the Willits bypass is being built, to ask for protection of the many Pomo ancestral cultural sites being discovered and destroyed by Caltrans on bypass mitigation lands. The ceremony will be led by Fred Short, spiritual leader of the American Indian Movement in California.
Concerns about the destruction of Native American cultural sites on the mitigation lands have been raised by local Pomo tribes in recent visits and letters to the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board and Army Corp of Engineers, agencies in charge of Caltrans’ 401 operating permit and the Mitigation and Monitoring Plan (MMP)
Testifying before the Water Board on June 18, Priscilla Hunter, Coyote Valley Tribal representative, stated: “The Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians objects to Caltrans’ use of the current requirements of the mitigation plan on the Willits Bypass Project as a rationale for not avoiding our ancestral cultural sites…due to the requirements of the Mitigation Monitoring Plan (MMP) approved by your agency”.
In a July 15, 2015 letter to Coyote Valley Tribal Chairman Hunter, from the Water Board, Mike Bartlett, Environmental Project Manager for Caltrans, responding to the concerns about the destruction of cultural sites, stated:
“…there are known sites where construction impacts are unavoidable due to [the] limited number of areas where the creation and rehabilitation of new wetlands is possible in Little Lake Valley”.
Acknowledging “…the possibility of uncovering previously unknown cultural resources during the creation and rehabilitation of wetland areas” Bartlett concluded that “Because Caltrans’ obligation is to create a certain amount of wetlands habitat…”, the destruction of cultural sites is “an unfortunate circumstance of the situation”.
The Coyote Valley Tribal Council responded in a letter of July 20th to Water Board Chair John Corbett, that “We consider this to be not just an “unfortunate circumstance” but a violation of the law. Caltrans is pointing the finger at the Water Board, saying the requirements of the MMP mandate them to side step CEQA and NHPA requirements to avoid and protect of ancestral sites. “
The letter documents a history of CEQA/NHPA violations by Caltrans in their wetlands creation activities in the Willits Bypass Project and provides numerous examples of sites discovered and destroyed “by bulldozer blade”. Since the EIR/EIS was approved in 2006, thirty culturally significant sites eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places in the Bypass alignment and Mitigation parcels have been discovered.
In 2012 and 2014, Caltrans submitted revised MMPs to decrease the net harm the Bypass caused to the plants, animals, and water in the Little Lake Valley without addressing Native American cultural resources. The MMPs call for substantial environmental impacts of their own, including roughly 100 acres of topsoil disruption to replace existing vegetation with native plants. …in an area…known to have housed more than 5,000 Pomo in seven villages up until the 1830s.
The letter alleges Caltrans knew there was “a high likelihood that these ancestral lands hold Pomo artifacts and, quite possibly, Native American human remains”, but began construction regardless, without performing proper surveys or considering impacts on Pomo cultural resources.
The letter alleges that Caltrans has changed the rules on the amount of lithic concentrations used to signify a potential culturally significant site. This deviation from professionally accepted standards is “… an apparent attempt to avoid further site identification and protection”. It concludes: “Caltrans…should not deviate from adequate efforts to identify and protect ancestral cultural sites due to their tardiness in complying with mitigation requirements”.
The Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians is calling for a temporary halt to construction until a supplemental EIS can be completed and approved.
###

Mendocino County Resident Tests Positive for West Nile Virus

Press Release

Not for op-ed

Date: July 21, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mendocino County Resident Tests Positive for West Nile Virus

 From: Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency – Dr. Craig McMillan, Public Health Medical Director and Dr. Charles Evans, Deputy Director of Communicable Disease Control Program

Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency, Public Health is reporting the first human case of West Nile Virus since 2014 in Mendocino County. It is unclear whether the patient was infected with the virus within Mendocino County, as the patient reports being bitten by mosquitoes while out of state during the incubation period. The patient is recovering. Mosquitoes have recently tested positive for West Nile Virus in Sonoma County, however.

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a disease transmitted to humans and animals through the bite of an infected mosquito. A person or animal that has been infected by West Nile Virus may have no symptoms of illness or they could become severely ill.

What are WNV Symptoms? (Symptoms can vary from severe to mild)

 Severe Symptoms occur in approximately less than 1% of persons infected by WNV. These symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, disorientation, tremors, coma, convulsions, muscle loss, numbness, paralysis and vision loss. Symptoms can last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent.

Mild Symptoms occur in up to 20% of persons infected with WNV, and include fever, headache, body aches, nausea, vomiting and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a rash on the chest, stomach and back. Persons with these symptoms can feel ill for a few days, while other persons may feel ill for several weeks. Approximately 80% who are infected with WNV do not have any symptoms at all and do not feel ill.

Who is at Risk?

�Persons over 50 years of age are at a higher risk to develop serious symptoms if they are infected with WNV

� Persons who spend a lot of time outdoors at dawn and/or at dusk.

Prevention:

�Avoid spending time outdoors at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most

active.

�Wear long pants and long sleeved shirts when outdoors and use insect

repellent. Products containing DEET appear to be more effective.

�Eliminate all sources of standing water to reduce mosquito breeding.

�Repair or replace torn screens on windows and doors to prevent mosquitoes

from entering your home.

�Add mosquito fish or larvicide to small ponds that do not have fish. For use of

larvicide, follow the directions on the package.

�There is a vaccine for horses to prevent WNV but no vaccine has been

developed for humans.

For more information on preventing West Nile Virus, visit the Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency Environmental Health website at http://www.westnile.ca.gov/prevention.htm

Lightning fires located on Mendocino National Forest

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 21, 2015

Lightning fires located on Mendocino National Forest

WILLOWS, Calif. – The Mendocino National Forest is currently locating and taking actions to suppress fires started by lightning yesterday.

The Forest received several hundred lightning strikes Monday afternoon and evening throughout the forest.

Since yesterday, the Forest has identified one fire on the Grindstone Ranger District on the east side of the Forest and two fires on the Covelo Ranger District on the northwest side of the Forest.

All of the fires are small, half an acre or less.  Progress towards containment has been made on all three fires.

As conditions continue to dry out and warm up, firefighters anticipate discovering more lightning fires in coming days.  There is also a chance of thunderstorms this afternoon and evening.

Forest visitors are asked to be aware of their surroundings and to be prepared for changing conditions.  This includes reporting visible smoke that could be from a wildfire.

To report a fire, please call 911.

As a reminder, the Mendocino National Forest is currently under fire restrictions.  Visitors are asked to follow regulations and be careful with anything with a flame or that can throw a spark in the forest.  For more information, please visit www.preventwildfireca.org/OneLessSpark/.

For more information, please contact the Mendocino National Forest at 530-934-3316 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/mendocino. Updates are also available on Twitter @MendocinoNF.