Coming up on Native America Calling – Week of 8/24/15

Monday, August 24, 2015 – Early Childhood Education
A federal report released in July surveyed 90 studies of the Head Start programs and found that the federal program has had “no discernible” effects in math and social emotional development. Since 1965, the Head Start program has provided early childhood education in Native American communities, but measuring the success of Head Start in Native America is difficult because many of the studies do not include American Indian and Alaska Native students. How effective are Head Start and other early childhood education programs? Are Native students benefiting from early childhood education in your area?
Tuesday, August 25, 2015 – Confronting Racism
It seems like we’re bombarded with racist and offensive things every day on the Internet and in real life. When it gets too hot and you feel like you have to say something, what’s the most effective way to educate someone about their offensive behavior? How can you keep your cool when the offensive words or actions make it feel like someone is slapping you in the face? What about in the workplace? What challenges arise when you confront a racist co-worker or a boss who makes offensive remarks about you and your people? Is anger ever a good way to get your point across?
 
Wednesday 26, 2015 – Welcoming Home Adoptees
Before the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, many Native children were adopted by non-Natives and a large portion of those adoptees lost their cultural ties to their tribes. Sandy White Hawk is an adoptee who found her way back to her family on the Rosebud reservation. She has now organized the first Welcome Home Gathering for the tribe, which is scheduled to take place on August 29, 2015. This gathering is only the second time that a tribe will welcome its adoptees home. The first was White Earth Anishnaabe in Minnesota. What does it take to organize an event like this? How could it help heal individuals and tribes heal wounds from the past? Guests: Sandy White Hawk (Sicangu Lakota), director of First Nations Repatriation Institute and organizer of the Welcoming Home Gathering, and Marlies White Hate (Sicangu Lakota), co-organizer of the Welcome home Gathering in Rosebud, South Dakota.
Thursday, August 27, 2015 – Access to Health Care for Veterans
Last year, the U.S. Department Veterans Affairs was heavily criticized for inadequate medical care and falsifying documents about wait times for veterans who needed to see a doctor. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki resigned amid the scandal. Congress later passed the Veterans Choice and Accountability Act of 2014. Are veterans getting the healthcare they need today? What has the VA done to improve care for Native veterans? Guests include Candy Klump (Muscogee Creek) – Native American nurse navigator at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
Friday, August 28, 2015 – Indigenous Latinos and Native America
Why do cultural identities and notions of indigeneity clash? On this show, we discuss the conflicts and issues that can arise as people express both their Latino identity and Native American identity. Are there lines to draw? Are there labels to make? Are lines and labels harmful? We also discuss what it means to be Latino and how the Latino community has changed over time.

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.
The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.
Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Third Annual Suicide Prevention Mobile Story Board and Presentation Tour September 7 – 13, 2015

Press Release

Date: August 19, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Third Annual Suicide Prevention Mobile Story Board and Presentation Tour September 7 – 13, 2015

This year Suicide Prevention Week is September 7 -13, 2015 and the theme is, “Suicide Prevention: Reaching Out and Saving Lives” .  Mendocino County€™s Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) Behavioral Health and Recovery Services (BHRS) third annual Suicide Prevention  Mobile Story Board Tour is featuring a collection of stories and art work submitted from those who have had personal experiences with severe depression or suicide. In addition, there will be a short suicide prevention presentation at each stop of the tour.  September 10 is World Suicide Prevention Day.

The public is invited to attend this special event at the following locations:

  • September 8, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. in Fort Bragg at the Hospitality Center, 101 N. Franklin St., Fort Bragg
  • September 8, Tuesday, 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. in Gualala at Action Network, 39144 Ocean Dr. Suites 3 & 4
  • September 8, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m. in Laytonville at Healthy Start Family Resource Center, 44400 Willis Ave., Laytonville
  • September 9, Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. in Willits at Manzanita Services, 286 N. School St., Willits
  • September 9, Wednesday, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. in Covelo at the Yuki Trails Human Services Program, 23000 Henderson Rd., Covelo
  • September 10, Thursday, 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. in Ukiah at Manzanita Services, 270 N. Pine St., Ukiah
  • September 10, Thursday, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. in Hopland at the Pomo Band of Indian’s Rancheria, 3000 Shannel Rd., Hopland
  • September 10, Thursday, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. in Potter Valley at the Potter Valley Family Resource Center, 10270 Main St., Potter Valley

 

The Mobile Story Board Tour Schedule will be published at:

http://www.co.mendocino.ca.us/hhsa/mhsa.htm

 

For further information contact: Robin Meloche, MHSA Coordinator at 707-472-2332.

Public Health Officer Reminds Parents of the Importance of Immunizations

Press Release

Not for op-ed

Date: August 19, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Public Health Officer Reminds Parents of the Importance of Immunizations

 As children are heading back to school, the Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency Public Health Officer, Dr. Constance Caldwell, would like to remind parents of the importance of immunizations and clarifying school immunization laws.

You may have heard about a new law called Senate Bill (SB) 277 that will eliminate the personal belief exemption in California. Please note that this law does not take effect until 2016, and thus does not affect school entry this fall.  Children entering kindergarten or 7th grade this year are required by law to have certain immunizations. This fall the law is the same as it was in 2014. Students must have the required immunizations, or have a permanent medical exemption, or have a personal belief exemption that has been signed by their physician.  If students have begun but not completed the required immunizations they may be admitted to school conditionally.  You may visit http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html for information on immunization schedules from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are helpful charts on the site that give information for parents and their children.

Dr. Caldwell states, “These immunizations are important to protect our children against several serious contagious diseases, including measles, mumps and whooping cough. Not only are immunizations essential for protecting our own children, they can also serve to protect other children who cannot be vaccinated because of medical conditions. It is called ‘herd immunity’ when those who are vaccinated also protect others who are not, but it only works when a very high percentage of the population is vaccinated.”

Parents needing to have their children immunized are encouraged to call their clinic or physician for an appointment. Recommended routine childhood immunizations (0 through 18 years of age) are available by appointment at HHSA Public Health in Ukiah for those who qualify for the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program.  VFC eligibility criteria includes those who are eligible for Medi-Cal, CHDP, are uninsured, underinsured, Native American or Alaskan Native.  Please call HHSA Public Health (707) 472-2600 to make an appointment.

Dog License Amnesty and Rabies Clinic this Saturday in Ukiah

Press Release

Not for op-ed

Date: August 19, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Dog License Amnesty and Rabies Clinic this Saturday in Ukiah

 Do you need to renew your dog’s license?  Is your cat and/or dog behind on their rabies vaccine?  Well here is your chance to get all caught up with the dog license amnesty program and rabies clinic scheduled for Saturday, August 22.

The amnesty program will waive late fees and past license fees. This offer is only valid for dog owners who do not have any outstanding citations for failing to license their dog or their dog is not currently impounded at the shelter. Prior to a dog being licensed you must provide proof of a current rabies vaccination.  You can take advantage of one stop shopping to bring your dog up to date with a vaccination and a license.

The rabies clinic will be held at the Animal Care Services Shelter at 298 Plant Road in Ukiah from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and the cost per rabies shot is $6.00.  Cats may also receive their rabies shot the same day and time.  It is best to bring your cat in a pet carrier.  It is equally important to vaccinate your pet cats.  They are often overlooked.

The amnesty program will take place on the same day from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the same location.  Payment for both the vaccine and the amnesty license program may be made in cash or check.

Don’t forget you can take care of your annual license services on-line by visiting http://www.co.mendocino.ca.us/hhsa/chs/animal/ or you may contact HHSA Animal Care Services at 707-463-4427 for further information on the Dog License Amnesty program or the Rabies Clinic.

Week of August 17 on Native America Calling

Monday, August 17, 2015 – Book of the Month: “Ears of Corn: Listen” 
Laguna Pueblo poet and potter Max Early gives readers the opportunity to learn about his Native community in his new book “Ears of Corn: Listen.” It is a window into the everyday as well as a guide to many special moments that take place in his tribal nation. Some of the poetry found in this collection features the language of Laguna Pueblo and the faces of community members of yesterday and today. We invite you to take a journey with us through Max’s creative process and his community stories this month in our latest celebration of Native literature.
Follow this conversation with our hashtag: #LAGUNApoet
Tuesday, August 18, 2015 – The Impact of the Gold King Mine Spill  
On Aug. 5, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally triggered a major toxic spill of mine waste into a creek that flowed into the Animas River in Colorado. The EPA estimates that about 3 million gallons of mining waste water was released. The spill turned the Animas, and later the San Juan River, bright orange. With the rivers closed, farmers, families and businesses are all affected by this spill. Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye announced plans to take legal action against the EPA to recover money spent on cleaning up the spill. It is also estimated that there are 23,000 abandoned mines in Colorado. Who is responsible for cleaning up abandoned mines? Cultural practices and livelihoods are often tied to water. How can tribes, states and the federal government work together to protect our sacred waterways? Guests: Dr. Karletta Chief (Diné) – assistant professor in the department of soil, water, and environmental sciences at the University of Arizona.
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 – Coming Home After Being Homeless 
What does it take to get back on your feet after a bout of homelessness? For some homeless Native Americans, the journey home is not as simple as finding an apartment and a job. They also need to reconnect with family and reestablish a place in their tribal communities. In today’s show, we discuss the issues homeless Natives face and we put the spotlight on programs and groups that work to try to bring homeless Natives home.
Thursday, August 20, 2015 – Detoxing From Drugs  
Recovering from drug addiction can be a challenging process. After admitting you have a problem, the next step is to stop using. Detoxification is the process of eliminating the drugs from your system. Withdrawal symptoms from detoxing can vary based on the drug being abused. Some opiate abusers are using a drug called Suboxone (Subutex), which contains an opiate, to treat opiate dependence. But is using an opiate to treat an opiate addiction the best solution? Have you or a loved one ever been through a detox program?
Friday, August 21, 2015 – Women in the Prison System 
The incarceration rate in the United States has risen dramatically in recent decades and the number of women in state and federal prisons is also on the rise. Although men outnumber women in the U.S. prison system, the number of female inmates in recent years has increased at a higher rate than male inmates, according to The Sentencing Project. What issues do Native women face in prison? The Sentencing Project also reports that women serving time in state prisons are more likely to have children than men in state prisons. How does a mother’s incarceration affect a young person? What about Native communities that have women serving time behind bars?

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

National Wildfire Preparedness Moves to Highest Level

For Immediate Release                                                                 

National Wildfire Preparedness Moves to Highest Level

                Boise, Idaho – The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group (NMAC) is increasing the National Fire Preparedness Level (PL) to its highest point, PL-5, effective at 5:30 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time on Thursday, August 13th. The PL ranges from one, indicating minimal activity, to five, which signals very high activity.

NMAC, which consists of top federal and state fire managers, sets the national PL. The raised preparedness level reflects a high degree of wildfire activity, a major commitment of fire resources, and the probability that severe conditions will continue for at least a few days.

“A significant amount of initial and extended attack and large fire activity has occurred over the past several days as a result of lightning storms that have intensified local and geographic response,” said Aitor Bidaburu, Chair of NMAC. “Given the continuing hot and dry weather and the increase in fire activity in the western U.S., the decision to move to Preparedness Level 5 depicts the complexity that fire managers are encountering to assure that adequate firefighting resources are available for protection of life, property and our nation’s natural resources.”

During periods of high wildfire activity, when assets are stretched thin, federal, tribal, state and local partners work together to prioritize wildfires so that those threatening life, property and valuable natural and cultural resources receive assets as quickly as possible. Professional wildfire managers adapt their strategies and tactics based on the assets that they receive and do the very best they can to suppress unwanted wildfires effectively and efficiently.

Wildfire activity has escalated in recent days after thunderstorms, many with little or no moisture, moved across parts of California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana, sparking hundreds of new fires. To date, 39,254 wildfires have burned nearly 6.4 million acres in the United States this year. The number of wildfires in 2015 represents about 80 percent of the ten-year average. However, the number of current acres burned represents about a 38 percent increase over the ten-year average at this point in the year.

The last time that the National Preparedness Level was raised to 5 was on August 20, 2013. The National Preparedness Level remained at 5 for 7 days until it was dropped to 4 on August 26, 2013. This is the fifth time that PL-5 has been reached in the last ten years.

During PL-5, further assistance from the military, beyond what is already in use, and international resources may be considered and requested, but no decisions have been made concerning those steps.

The fire forecast for most of the West predicts above normal temperatures, below normal precipitation, and continuing drought in many areas into the fall.

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Veterans Stand Down/Resource Fair September 9 & 10, 2015 Seeking Volunteers

Press Release

Date: August 12, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Veterans Stand Down/Resource Fair September 9 & 10, 2015 Seeking Volunteers

Mendocino County Veterans Services Office is looking for Volunteers to support our Veterans for the second annual Lake and Mendocino Veterans Stand Down /Resource Fair.  This event will be held Wednesday, September 9, 2015 and Thursday, September 10, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Clearlake, at the American Legion Post 437 located at 14770 Austin Road, Clearlake, California.

Volunteers may be helping to organize supplies, pass out clothing or toiletry items and food prep.   These are a few of the opportunities available to help veterans and their families at the Lake and Mendocino Counties Stand Down/ Resource Fair.

If you would like to volunteer to assist with this event, it could be all day or few hours, we would greatly appreciate your support.   Please contact Alice Watkins at mendovets@co.mendocino.ca.us or 707-463-4226.

Veterans Stand Down / Resource Fair September 9 & 10, 2015 Providing Services to Veterans

Press Release

Date: August 11, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Veterans Stand Down / Resource Fair September 9 & 10, 2015 Providing Services to Veterans

 Save the Date: Lake and Mendocino Counties are sponsoring the second annual Stand Down/Resource Fair in Clearlake at the American Legion Post 437 located at 14770 Austin Road, Clearlake, CA on September 9 &10, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The Stand Down/Resource Fair is an event that is held in cities all over the nation to provide food, clothing, services and referrals to homeless and at Risk veterans and is a free. The Lake and Mendocino Counties event will offer access to on-site medical and dental attention, enrollment in healthcare and supplemental nutrition programs. The 2014 event featured approximately 30 different agencies that offered supplies, aid and services to veterans.

Please contact the Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency, Veteran’s Services office at 707-463-4226 or mendovets@co.mendocino.ca.us for additional information or if you would like to volunteer with the event.

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Health and Human Services Agency Animal Care Services Care-A-Van in Laytonville Again

Press Release

Date: August 11, 2015

Health and Human Services Agency Animal Care Services Care-A-Van in Laytonville Again

 The Mendocino County Health and Human Services Agency Animal Care Services Care-A-Van will be returning to Laytonville on Sunday, August 16 to continue to care for the areas pets.

The Care-A-Van will be at the Feed Store on Branscomb Road in Laytonville between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.  Rabies vaccines will be available for cats and dogs at a cost of $6.00 per shot and other vaccines will be available as well as microchips. No appointment is necessary for these services.

For spay and neuter appointments and a request to have the Care-A-Van visit your community, please contact Bliss at 707-888-7698.

Just a reminder, don’t overlook a rabies vaccine for your cats.  They need the protection as much as the pups!

 

Additional Firewood Permit and Area on Jackson Demonstration State Forest

CAL FIRE NEWS RELEASE

DATE: August 11, 2015

Additional Firewood Permit and Area on Jackson Demonstration State Forest

 Fort Bragg– California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) Mendocino Unit is pleased to announce the sale of one additional firewood permit per household on Jackson Demonstration State Forest (JDSF) beginning Monday, August 17, 2015 at 8:00 a.m. Firewood permits are for two cords per household at a cost of $20.00/permit.

Further, a second firewood gathering area is being opened on August 17th. Permit holders with remaining tags can return to the JDSF office in Fort Bragg with their permit and remaining tags in order to receive an updated map of the new firewood area. Firewood areas are tentatively scheduled to close on September 30, 2015, or until wood supply is gone, a significant rain event, or other resource constraints force closure, whichever occurs first.

Firewood permits and information on how to safely engage in collecting firewood are available at the CAL FIRE Fort Bragg office located at 802 North Main Street, Fort Bragg, CA (707) 964-5674. Office hours are 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. (closed from 12-1:00 p.m.) Monday through Friday.

Multiple uses of JDSF for a wide variety of activities that benefit the public, the economy and natural resources are what our demonstration forests are all about.

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