MENDOCINO COUNTY ENHANCES AVAILABILITY TO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS RESOURCES

Ukiah, California…November 15, 2016
MENDOCINO COUNTY ENHANCES AVAILABILITY TO BOARDS AND
COMMISSIONS RESOURCES
On November 15, 2016, the Mendocino County Executive Office will launch a new online Boards and
Commissions resource on the County webpage: The Board of Supervisors encourages citizen
involvement and expertise to assist the Board in serving the community. Boards and Commissions were
established to help the Board address many and varied duties and responsibilities of local County
government. These Boards and Commissions are created by State or Federal law, County ordinance, or
by action of the Board of Supervisors and provide forums for citizen input and accessibility to County
government. The Board of Supervisors relies on these groups to advise them on a wide-range of issues
affecting their constituencies, and to assure they are responsive to community needs.
This resource enhancement will allow the public greater access to information regarding the over 100
County Boards, Commissions, and Special Districts. Members of the public will now have the ability to
access rosters, contact information, and membership details for all County Boards, Commissions, and
Special Districts electronically. Additionally, it will allow the public to view detailed vacancy
information and apply for vacancies on various County Boards and Commissions online.
Applicants for County Boards and Commissions are encouraged to apply online, however, hard copy
applications will continue to be accepted by the Mendocino County Executive Office at 501 Low Gap
Road, Room 1010, Ukiah, CA 95482 or via fax to (707) 463-7237. Individuals interested in serving on
elected Special District positions must continue to file for candidacy with the Mendocino County Clerk-
Recorder’s Office.
The Boards and Commissions resource may be accessed online at
www.co.mendocino.ca.us/bos/boardscommissions.htm. For more information, please contact the
Executive Office at (707) 463-4441.
Released by:
Carmel J. Angelo
Chief Executive Officer

Posted in NV1

Forest road construction update

Forest road construction update

WILLOWS, Calif.; October 12, 2016 – For Immediate Release – Mendocino National Forest officials would like to take this opportunity to provide an update about road construction across the forest including the completion of several projects, the continuation of construction in a couple areas and the postponement of one project.

Projects completed include Forest Road 17N06 to Summit Springs, Letts Lake and the first phase of construction on the M4 Road from Paskenta to Mendocino Pass. The next phase of the M4 Road is paving and that is planned for November.  The Fouts Campground surfacing has been postponed. Road construction continues on the following roads:

M1 – Forest Order Closure has been extended thru October 31. Road is closed from approximately 4.5 miles northeast of the Eel River Work Center to the seasonal gate closure on Boardman Ridge.

M6 – Road will be closed from August 1 to November 4, from M61 intersection to 19N68 road. See Forest Order No. 08-16-15 for more details.

Additionally, on the Grindstone Ranger District, two bridges west of Forest Highway 7 near         Cottonwood Glade have been barricaded to vehicle traffic for safety purposes. For more information, please check the forest website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/mendocino/.
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Posted in NV1

Week of May 16 on Native America Calling

Monday, May 16, 2016 – Keeping our kids safe
Protecting children is a top priority for most families. As communities mourn the recent abduction and murder of young Navajo girl, we’ll take a moment to discuss how we can protect our children from harm. What should parents, grandparents and family members share with children about staying safe? What conversations should we be having with our kids about interacting with strangers or even people within our own circles?

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 – Confronting LGBTQ2 discrimination
Fear is a common reaction to something we don’t understand–especially when it’s something as intimate as sexuality. Some people have strong reactions when crossing paths with LGBTQ2 people. At times those reactions can lead to harsh words and even violence. We acknowledge the International Day Against Homophobia by exploring what discrimination against members of the Native American LGBTQ2 community looks like. How does this type of discrimination hurt the citizens of our Nations? Is there a way for all of us to exist together peacefully?

Wednesday, May 18, 2016 – The secondhand smoke problem
Do you ever notice the smell of cigarette smoke on your clothes when you come home from a night at the casino? Smoking rates have steadily declined since the 1960s. But there are still a lot of places where you inhale smoke from someone else’s cigarette. Exposure to secondhand smoke was responsible for more than 7,300 lung cancer deaths over a four year period according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What can be done to reduce the risks of secondhand smoke exposure? Is the vapor from e-cigarettes less dangerous?

Thursday, May 19, 2016 – When one suicide leads to many
If one person commits suicide, it’s devastating for a family and a group of friends. When suicides come in clusters, it requires a larger community response. The Attawapiskat First Nation of Canada recently declared a state of emergency after 101 people attempted to kill themselves since September. Can a single suicide put others at risk? What can community members and social workers do to prevent groups of suicides?

Friday, May 20, 2016 – Gone Fishing
Fishing is about the water, the quality time with your buddies and the thrill of the sport. It’s also about getting into the mind of a rout and finding out what he’s willing to bite. It taps into our hunting instincts and using trickery and skill. Sometimes it’s to catch food, other times it’s just for fun. We’re celebrating one of our favorite pastimes. Tell us about your biggest catch.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of May 9 on Native America Calling

Monday, May 9, 2016 – Putting Pe’ Sla into trust
State and tribal governments are currently clashing over a sacred area known as Pe’ Sla or ‘The Heart of All That Is’. The Bureau of Indian Affairs approved putting the 2,000-acre parcel of South Dakota Black Hills land into trust. A coalition of the Shakopee Mdewakanton, Rosebud, Crow Creek, and Standing Rock Sioux tribes purchased it in 2012. Governor Dennis Daugaard, opposes the tribes’ effort. In addition he suggested the tribes had more important things to invest their money in, like caring for their elders. How does the trust designation help tribes? Will this set a precedent for other tribes buying back sacred land?

Tuesday, May 10, 2016 – Dakota Access Pipeline
The proposed 1,168-mile Dakota Access Pipeline already has approval from states and a majority of private landowners in its path. Supporters say it will bring hundreds of jobs and will boost the economy. But tribes and others oppose the plan. They’re worried about the possibility of a catastrophic leak endangering precious water resources and culturally significant land. Where’s the line between job-creation and environmental protection? Why do you support or oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline?

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 – Shining the light on skin cancer
Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. May is Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. How can you tell if a mole is cancerous? Do you put on sunscreen every day? We’ll speak with an expert about the best ways to prevent and detect skin cancer.

Thursday, May 12, 2016 – Protecting our babies
The infant mortality rate in Native America is 1.5 times higher than for whites, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. In the Great Plains area, Native babies are three times more likely to die before their first birthday than white babies, according to the CDC and Northern Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center.  If our children are sacred, why is the threat so great? Does the issue lie in prenatal health?

Friday, May 13, 2016 – Literacy: Reading between the lines
Does your idea of reading begin and end with text messages on your phone?
Year after year, Native American students lag behind other groups when it comes to reading levels. The Literacy Project links higher levels of reading with increased income and lower levels of incarceration. Several programs are working to get more books in the hands of Native Americans.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of May 2 on Native America Calling

Monday, May 2, 2016 – Reading and Writing in our Native Languages
First we learn to talk. And then comes reading and writing. In Native America, tribes and tribal members are working hard to revitalize and speak our Native languages. But what about the written word? In the mid-19th century, a Cherokee named Sequoyah invented a syllabary for the Cherokee language, which is still used today in publications and signs across the three Cherokee tribes. Where does the written word fit into your language? Is learning to read or write critical to the future of our languages?

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 – Cradleboards and other baby carriers
Cradleboards are useful, beautiful and can tell stories about the communities from which they come. For millennia, Native parents have been securely wrapping up their babies in adorned carriers. On this show we’ll explore the history of cradleboards and other baby baskets across tribal nations. We’ll also talk about how some parents today are returning to traditional baby carriers.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 – Frontier of Change: an audio project on climate change in Alaska
The producers of “Frontier of Change” gathered stories from Alaska Native people whose lives are being affected by climate change. The project includes interviews, environmental audio and other sounds that bring this important story to life. We’ll hear from the producers about the project and how Indigenous communities are struggling with disappearing land, vanishing wildlife, erosion, and other catastrophes brought on by climate change. Are you seeing the effects of climate change in your Native community? How can storytelling address the issue?

Thursday, May 5, 2016 – Doctor shortage at IHS
Doctor shortages in Indian country make it difficult for patients to get the health care they were promised. The agency overseeing the Indian Health Service acknowledged in a hearing last year that IHS is short on providers. Officials revealed then that vacancy rates for physicians at IHS reached 20 percent in 2013. The number is even higher in certain areas. What are the long term effects to doctor and other medical care provider shortages in Indian country? Is more money the answer?

Friday, May 6, 2016 – Pomp and Circumstance
It’s graduation season and it’s time to celebrate graduates. They worked hard for years to get a piece of paper, a stamped seal, a tassel and a change in their educational status. In this hour, we celebrate Native graduates and find out how their culture mixes in with “Pomp and Circumstance.” Do you have a graduate in your family that you’re proud of? Tune in, call in and shout out.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of April 11 on Native America Calling

Monday, April 11 2016 – Do you fear the police?
The fatal police shooting of a Navajo woman in Winslow, Arizona is raising questions again about interactions with police. Officials say she threatened the officer with scissors when stopped during a shoplifting investigation. Loreal Tsingine’s family and friends are left wondering what kind of threat the 27 year old woman posed that warranted her death. Tribal leaders and others want an official inquiry to hold the police accountable for what many members of the public see as an overreaction. How are police trained to react in such situations?

Tuesday, April 12 2016 – Indigenous activists in Latin America
This week in Honduras, friends are supporters are taking time to celebrate the life of slain Indigenous environmental activist Berta Caceres. More than a month after her murder, the government has offered few details about their death. Human rights groups around the world condemn the attack and urge the Honduran government to act to protect other activists. We’ll talk about Caceres’ life and death and the plight of those speaking up for Indigenous people in Latin America.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016 – Can’t you take a joke?
An old bit by comedian Ralphie May surfaced just before his scheduled appearance in Bemidji Minnesota on the cusp of the Red Lake Reservation. It was an R-rated rant using the worst Native American stereotypes. The venue in Bemidji cancelled May’s appearance and another date in Sioux Falls is threatened. He insists it was all a joke taken out of context. He also mentions he’s an equal-opportunity comic who makes fun of everyone. How come this one touched a nerve?

Thursday, April 14, 2016 – Access to birth control
There are pills, injections and implants. But what is the real access to birth control in Native America? Do Native women face more barriers, such as social pressure, when it comes to birth control? In this show, we’ll also talk about court cases and legislation that affects access to birth control.

Friday, April 15, 2016 – The facts about taxes
The deadline for filing taxes is upon us. Now is a good time for some expert tips and tricks. People living in Indian Country have unique tax requirements. What deductions make the most sense? How about artists and other self-employed workers? And we’ll confront the prevailing myth that Natives don’t pay taxes. We have an hour and will get to as many of your questions as we can.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of March 28 on Native America Calling

Monday, March 28, 2016 – Children and parents coping with hearing impairment
As many as 5 out of every 1,000 children have some type of hearing loss, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Causes range from genetics to infections, and the consequences can last a lifetime. Parents new to the issue face a daunting list of options and treatments. In Native America, do families have all they need to raise a child that is hearing impaired?

Tuesday, March 29, 2016 – Why I don’t vote
Election season seems to be never-ending these days. And it’s hard to escape people telling you–on social media, TV and even in person–how important it is to cast your vote. If it’s so important, why does nearly half of the voting-age public in the U.S. stay home on some election days?  Do you make the decision to not vote? One of our guests says voting is a product of colonialism. How important is voting (or not voting) to you?

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 – Know Your Party: third parties
Two political parties dominate the U.S. electoral system. Ever since the party system emerged in the 1800s, presidential elections have gone to either Democrats or Republicans. In the final installment of our series on political parties, we take a look at the role third parties play. The main alternatives to the top two are the Green Party, the Libertarian Party and the Constitution Party. Can Native voters find what they are looking for in a third party?

Thursday, March 31, 2016 – Songs for baby
Music is a major part of our Native communities and culture. Singing songs to our little ones provides a vital connection to language and culture. We take time to discuss the importance of singing to babies and children. What were you taught growing up about sharing songs with young ones? Do you have memories of your parents and loved ones sing to you?

Friday, April 1, 2016 – There is an app for that!
Smart phones have radically transformed our lives. Information is at our fingertips whenever we want, as long as we have a signal. Applications, or apps, give us convenient answers to questions like “where am I going” and even, “what should I do right now so I’m not bored.” We’ll take a look at a number of apps specifically designed to make Indigenous lives better. How about a dating app that matches you with your perfect blood quantum soul mate? Or what about an app that gives you the exact distance to the nearest Indian taco?

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of March 21 on Native America Calling

Monday, March 21 2016 – Carbon Credits in Native America
Can you buy forgiveness for environmental damage? Carbon credits offer opportunities for companies and even individuals to balance out their greenhouse gas emissions by paying another entity that promises to lower emissions. Some tribes think selling carbon credits might be an economic opportunity as well as a way to protect resources.

Tuesday, March 22 2016 – Christianity and tradition
Christianity in Native America has a complicated history. Early Christian missionaries discouraged traditional religious and spiritual practices within the tribes. But today many Native Americans adhere to a variety of Christian denominations including Catholic, Mormon, and Southern Baptist. They sometimes merge traditional spiritual practices with longstanding Christian beliefs. Can you practice both?

Wednesday, March 23 2016 – Breaking a Leg: Native Theater
All the world’s a stage-and some stages are used to showcase Native American stories and talent. Whether it’s drama or comedy, classic or avant garde, Native-centered theater is reaching more and more audiences. What makes theater Native? What are the audiences saying? Is it difficult to find Native actors?

Thursday, March 24 2016 – The inevitability of menopause
It’s unavoidable. Women in their 40s and 50s face a whole slew of physical changes ranging from hot flashes to mood swings. What should Native American women know about menopause and how can they prepare for it? What potential health complications should they discuss with their doctors?

Friday, March 25 2016 – March in news
The presidential race keeps surprising us with each passing week as a flamboyant mogul with no political experience continues his march his way to the GOP nomination. Also, the outgoing president of the United States meets with the incoming prime minister of Canada and both have high regard in Indian Country. We catch up on all the top news stories from Native America.
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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of March 14 on Native America Calling

Monday, March 14 2016 – Glass Art in Native America
Forming glass from sand has ancient roots. But using glass in art is a relatively new medium for Native American artists. Those who work with glass turn traditional images, shapes, and ideas into sculpture that is as beautiful as it is fragile. The works take after traditional baskets, jars, totems and masks. A handful of Native American artists have mastered the process that involves forming molten glass into intricate patterns. We will talk to the artists about the joys and frustrations of working with glass to satisfy their inspiration.

Tuesday, March 15 2016 – It’s like muggles writing about wizards
Two non-Native authors are enjoying reasonable success with Native American-themed works. Jason Aaron’s comic series ‘Scalped’ is set on a fictional South Dakota reservation where tribal mobsters punish their enemies with violence the author depicts in graphic detail. His work is considered for a TV show. And renowned Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling is under fire for appropriating Native American culture in essays published for her “History of Magic in North America” series. Are you fans of any of these works? Are you disappointed when respected writers try to portray Native American culture?

Wednesday, March 16, 2016 – March Music Maker: Patrick Landeza
Hawaiian music has roots as deep as the Native Hawaiian musicians that gracefully move through the notes. This month we take the time to visit with slack key guitarist Patrick Landeza (Native Hawaiian), an award-winning artist who uses this style of music to share not only his but his family’s story. His newest album “Nahe’olu” is a melodic gift from his memories of growing up. We hope you can join us as we connect to these Native Hawaiian musical origins with our March Music Maker.

Thursday, March 17 2016 – Protecting Bears Ears
The nearly two million acres in southeastern Utah is so important that five tribes are proposing an unprecedented collaboration with the federal government. The coalition wants President Barack Obama to establish the Bears Ears National Monument. A proposal in the Utah legislature would pre-empt that effort. We will get an update on the effort to protect Bears Ears. We’ll also discuss the implications of national monument status.

Friday, March 18 2016 – Native HIV/AIDS Awareness
“Hear Indigenous Voices: Uniting the Bold Voices of American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians.” That’s this year’s theme for National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (which is on March 20). We’ll talk with advocates to hear how they are using their voices to prevent Native Americans from getting HIV. We’ll also hear about the latest ideas for supporting those who already have it. Is it difficult to discuss HIV and AIDS in your Native community?

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of February 15 on Native America Calling

Monday, February 15, 2016 – Best and worst presidents
As the nation ponders the election of the 45th president later this year, we take time on this President’s Day to consider the previous 44 office holders. Who are regarded as the best and worst U.S. presidents for Native America? Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but he also approved the hanging of 38 Dakota warriors in 1862. Many are calling for the removal of Andrew Jackson’s face of the twenty dollar bill because of Indian Removal. And Richard Nixon ushered in a new era of Native self-determination. What makes someone a good president?

Tuesday, February 16, 2016 – Living with an addict
When you love and care for someone struggling with drug or alcohol addiction, how do you deal with the fear, frustration and sadness that comes with it? People caught up in substance abuse often lie, steal, and struggle with repeated relapses. Is there a way to help a son, daughter, parent or friend who is an addict? And is there support for family and friends who are watching their loved one spiral out of control?

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 – Canada’s dark legacy with First Nations children
The Canadian government systematically discriminated against First Nations children by underfunding welfare services for years. That’s the landmark ruling by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. What follows such a major revelation? What’s the solution? What parallels can be drawn between Canada and America regarding child welfare issues?

Thursday, February 18, 2016 – Know your party: Democrats
Super Tuesday is just around the corner, and the list of viable candidates for each political party continues to dwindle. On this show we begin a new series taking a deeper look at political affiliation in the U.S. Up first: the Democrats. Founded in 1792, the party was divided on slavery but is credited with pushing through the Civil Rights Act of 1964. What does the Democratic Party represent today? What have Democrats accomplished for Native America?

Friday, February 19, 2016 – The emotional side of weight loss
For people who are overweight, shedding a lot of pounds is a healthy way to go. But it comes with its own burden many people don’t think about. Just mustering the drive to lose weight takes a lot of effort. Then it’s almost like becoming a different person. You look different in the mirror and people treat you differently. We’ll hear from individuals who have lost a significant amount of weight. They’ll discuss the physical benefits as well as the unexpected emotional side of their process of weight loss.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.