Week of December 28 on Native America Calling

Monday, December 28, 2015 – Star Stories in Native America
In Native America, the stars are more than sparkly lights in the night sky. They reveal our origin stories, hero stories or moral teachings. We’re telling star stories and discussing why the stars are important for those of us on Earth. Why are the stars important to you?

Tuesday, December 29, 2015 – December in the News
President Obama signed a $1.8 trillion spending bill, avoiding a shutdown. The Fairbanks Four convictions were thrown out. And a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act. These stories and more are up for discussion as well as a look back at the best and worst Native headlines in 2015.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015 – Tribal Courts and the Dollar General Case
An alleged sexual assault of a Choctaw teenager in a Dollar General store on the reservation, turned into a high-profile Supreme Court case. In Dollar General Corporation v. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the petitioners argue tribal courts can’t provide a fair and do not have jurisdiction. The tribe maintains it has jurisdiction to hear the civil case and has the power to impose penalties in tribal court. A decision by the Supreme Court could have a far-reaching effect on tribal sovereignty and the power of tribal courts.  Should tribal courts have the power to hear civil suits against non-Native owned businesses?

Thursday, December 31, 2015 – 2015 Walked On
On this last day of the year, we’ll take another look at the leaders, artists and other significant people who we lost. This is our day to reflect on the accomplishments and inspirations of those who will remain in our memories. It’s a powerful hour of reflection with expert advice for everyone about ways to handle grief. Who would you like to remember in 2015?

Friday, January 1, 2016 – The Year in Review
We’re looking ahead to the new year, but first we want to remember what came before. Here’s your opportunity to recall some of the most inspiring, aggravating and entertaining moments of 2015. Our staff hand picked some of the most memorable moments of the year and distilled them into an hour of reflection and reminiscence.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of December 21 on Native America Calling

Monday, December 21, 2015 – Climate Change
Nearly 200 nations agreed to cut greenhouse gas emissions at the COP 21 summit in Paris this month. They’re going to limit the global rise in temperatures. Nothing in the agreement is legally binding, but supporters applaud the step forward. The agreement also mentions contributions by Indigenous populations, although there are no specific protections. We will talk to members of the Indigenous delegation to the talks and hear their perspectives on how this agreement saves the world. Or at least tilts in the right direction.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015 – Help Me in the Kitchen: Holiday Edition
The holiday dinner is right around the corner. Our plates will be filled with some sort of succulent meat, numerous sides and at least one dessert. The holiday dinner may look perfect in your head, but sometimes it doesn’t turn out that way. Some folks are not aces in the kitchen and probably never get invited to bring food to the holiday potluck. In this episode, we’re going to help you in the kitchen. Do you have questions about that raspberry torte recipe? Are you wondering what kind of sauce compliments roast lamb?

Wednesday, December 23, 2015 – String Games and Figures
For some tribes, winter means it’s time to take out the string. Choreographed finger movements weave strings into intricate figures and designs-stars, animals, heroes and tricksters. Depending on the pattern, a person playing string games can hold an entire story in their hands. String figures are made all over the world and many tribes in the U.S. have their own stories behind them. How does your tribe use string figures? What’s your favorite string game?

Thursday, December 24, 2015 – The Best (and Worst) Gifts
We take our annual look at people’s personal experiences with giving and receiving. We hear from our listeners and from many of the people we’ve crossed paths with recently about memorable gifts–from white elephants to cherished keepsakes, from Bed, Bath & Beyond gift cards to family togetherness.

Friday, December 25, 2015: Best of Music Makers
Today we take a look back at 2015 through the music. On this pre-recorded program you’ll hear the voices of some of the musicians that graced our airwaves this year. From the Native American flute to jazz and R&B to rock, the Native musicians that we caught up with this year brought a lot of great rhythms to our ears. Was there a particular music maker you that taught you a thing or two about their nation this year?

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of December 14 on Native America Calling

Monday, December 14, 2015 – Celebrating John Trudell
John Trudell was a complex and charismatic poet, musician, actor and activist. We take time to highlight the accomplishments of the man whose life touched so many others. His early years were devoted to activist causes, including a leadership post with AIM. He later released 14 albums of music starting with A.K.A. Grafitti Man. He also published a collection of his poetry and appeared in several films. His rich life inspired many others.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015 – Boxing in Native America
Going toe-to-toe with another person trying to punch you in the face is not everyone’s idea of a good time. But the sport of boxing is a way of life for some athletes in Native America. Modern day warriors compete in the ring for local, national and even international titles. Sometimes they just duke it out to earn the respect of their gym.  How is boxing connected to your Native community?  How is it connected to your life?

Wednesday, December 16, 2015 – Remembering the Wounded Knee Massacre
This month marks 125 years since the massacre at Wounded Knee Creek. Estimates put the number of men, women and children killed at nearly 300. The U.S. government awarded 20 Medals of Honor to soldiers who participated in the massacre. For 25 years, the Chief Bigfoot Band Memorial Ride retraces Chief Bigfoot’s steps, ending at the Wounded Knee massacre site. This year the ride will include a ceremony to end all massacres. How can communities heal such trauma from the past?

Thursday, December 17, 2015 – Recap: “The Ridiculous 6”
After a wave of controversy on the set, Adam Sandler’s film “The Ridiculous 6” debuted on Netflix. In April, Native American actors walked out of production because they believed certain parts of the script were offensive. At the time, the argument took to social media with the hashtag #NotYourHollywoodIndian. Did the final product end up as bad as the hype?

Friday, December 18, 2015 – December Book of the Month: Warrior Nation: A History of the Red Lake Ojibwe by Anton Treuer
The Red Lake Nation reservation is home to the largest number of Ojibwe language speakers in Minnesota. Professor and linguist Anton Treuer conducted oral histories with Red Lake elders. He was also given access to Red Lake Nation archival collections. He paints a compelling and vital account that includes formation of the first modern Indigenous democratic governance system in the U.S. “Warrior Nation: A History of the Red Lake Ojibwe” is the December Book of the Month.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of December 7 on Native America Calling

Monday, December 7, 2015 – Interpreting Dreams
Have you ever woken from a dream and wondered what it all meant? Dreams about flying, falling or even being chased can mean different things to different people. Sometimes our dreams can provide insight into our daily lives, and sometimes they are just puzzling. Native Voice One’s show Seers from the First People explores what dreams mean. Join us for a conversation with the hosts, who will analyze your dreams from their perspective.

Tuesday December 8, 2015 – History from an Indigenous Perspective
The history of record is often told by those in dominate society, while other communities find their voices silenced. An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States tells 400 years of history from an Indigenous perspective. Join us for a conversation with the author, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz about the U.S. policies, events and decisions that shaped the future of Native America.

Wednesday, December 9, 2015 – Smoking in Native America
Why are Native Americans still smoking so much? American cigarette smoking on the whole is on the decline. But Native Americans and Alaska Natives are the heaviest smokers compared to all other ethnicities. Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death.

Thursday, December 10, 2015 – Reclaiming History
Language, culture and identity are helping educators and advocates tackle social issues like substance abuse and depression.  Organizations are turning to Native values like respect to address homelessness and caring elders.  Native movements are helping replace other figures that historically oppressed Native nations. Others are restoring traditional place names. What types of movements are reshaping your community? What are the secrets to inspiring Indigenous youth to better their surroundings?

Friday, December 11, 2015 – December Music Maker: Gyasi Ross
Over the years Native America has had the chance to experience what Blackfeet & Suquamish author, attorney, activist and poet Gyasi Ross has had to say through news outlets and his book. This month we bring you the opportunity to hear Gyasi through his new album “Isskootsik (Before Here Was Here)” off of Cabin Games label. It’s a blend of spoken word poetry that opens up stories about life and lessons learned all set to a rhythmic hip-hop sound. Names like Winona LaDuke and Marlon Brando are thrown into the mix of words on a couple of the tracks.

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Native America Calling – Week of November 16

Monday, November 16, 2015 – Keystone XL pipeline rejection
From Canadian First Nations to the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, pressure from Native sources was instrumental in helping torpedo the Keystone XL oil pipeline. President Barack Obama rejected the pipeline proposal that would have pumped crude oil from Canada to Illinois and eventually, the Gulf of Mexico. The rejection is victory for environmentalists and tribes who have been fighting the proposal since 2008. How does stopping the pipeline help Native America? Did the president take tribal concerns into account in his decision? The lack of an oil pipeline means more oil shipped by rail and highway. What does Indian Country say to that?

Tuesday, November 17, 2015 – November Music Maker: Kimberley Dawn
Kimberley Dawn’s album “‘Til the Cowboys Come Home,” is packed with the driving rhythms and tough-love lyrics country music fans cherish like a pair of favorite blue jeans. Dawn (Métis Cree) will be with us for our next look at Native music. Join us for another hour of musical delight from First Nations singer Kimberley Dawn, our November Music Maker.

Follow this conversation with the hastag: #MusicMakerKimberleyDawn.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 – Postpartum Depression
The birth of a child is a sacred and cherished event. The weeks and months that follow are a whirlwind of joy and anxiety for new mothers. But there are times when dark thoughts persist. Some mothers suffer negative emotions, constant crying, and difficulty establishing attachment to the baby. Between 10 to 15 percent of women get postpartum depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Studies by the University of North Carolina suggest Native American women experience even more instances of postpartum depression than other populations. How does postpartum depression effect children, families and Native communities? Are Native American mothers getting the help they need when experiencing postpartum depression?

Thursday, November 19, 2015 – Help Me in The Kitchen!
It’s the time of year to take out all the stops and spend a little extra time in the kitchen. A special meal can bring families together and make cherished memories. But creating a celebratory feast is fraught with challenges. If you need some help and advice in the kitchen, we’re here for you. In this episode, we invite two expert Native chefs to answer your cooking questions. So if your last batch of wild rice risotto was a disaster, our guest chefs might have some advice for you.

Friday, November 20, 2015 – Protecting Sacred Places from Drilling
The Badger-Two Medicine traditional cultural district of Montana is considered sacred to the Blackfeet tribe. Earlier this month, Agriculture Secretary Thomas Vilsack sent a letter to Interior Secretary Sally Jewel urging her to cancel the energy leases for the area. The Blackfeet Tribe of Montana said the leases were granted illegally and the tribe has a “deep spiritual connection to this profoundly spiritual region.” Is your community working to protect a sacred place from energy development? What challenges do tribes face when fighting for their sacred places?

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Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of November 2 on Native America Calling

Monday, November 2, 2015 – Official Apologies
Pope Francis apologized to Indigenous leaders in July and asked forgiveness, “for not only for the offenses of the church herself, but also for crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America.”President Obama in 2009 signed a Native American Apology Resolution that was tacked onto the defense appropriations bill. In 2008 the Canadian government apologized and created a Truth and Reconciliation Commission for the victims of the residential school system. What is the purpose of an official apology? Is it enough? Are apologies a step toward reconciliation? Should they come with concrete obligations?

Tuesday, November 3, 2015 – Canadian Elections
Canada swears in a new Prime Minister Wednesday, switching political directions after nine years of Conservative Party rule. An unprecedented rise in aboriginal turnout helped sweep Stephen Harper out of office and Justin Trudeau in. What prompted the electoral shift? What does the Trudeau government mean for us? What lessons can Native Americans learn from the Canadian elections?

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 – Is debt always bad?
From the highest offices of government to your personal bank account, debt is a big part of your daily life. Congress deals with the country’s debt by raising the government’s limit just before the deadline. But most people have no such power over how they pay off their mortgages or student loans. When is taking on debt a good idea?  We’ll discuss different kinds of debt and how the peoples’ views have changed over the years. We’ll also talk about strategies to get out of debt and prepare your budget for the holiday spending season.

Thursday, November 5, 2015 – Suicide Prevention
A man committed suicide in front of dozens of horrified onlookers at the Alaska Federation of Natives conference in Anchorage. The tragedy came even as the conference worked to address troubling suicide statistics in Native populations. Native American and Alaska Native men between 18 to 24 years old are much more likely to commit suicide than the rest of the population, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Are suicide prevention programs helping? Is there a model program or an amount of money that can save lives?

Friday, November 6, 2015 – Prepping for Disaster
There are those among us who believe the end is near. They are preparing for the end of civilization brought on by economic collapse, war, natural disaster or even the zombie apocalypse. Some go as far as spending money and time gathering emergency supplies and food for when the time comes. Is this is a good idea? Should we all be prepping for some type of disaster, big or small? When harsh weather strikes or wildfires threaten your community, will you be prepared?

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of October 26 on Native America Calling

Monday, October 26, 2015 – Domestic Violence Shelters
Leaving an abusive relationship can be a difficult journey, particularly if the victim lives with her abuser. A domestic violence shelter may be the only option. For Native American women those options are limited. There are fewer than 30 shelters in the U.S. geared specifically toward helping Native American women, according to the most recent figures by Mending the Sacred Hoop. On this episode we’ll discuss why there is a need for more shelters for Native American women. Does your community have a domestic violence shelter?

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 – Redface in the Entertainment Industry
A burlesque performer drew protests for wearing a buckskin bikini and feather headdress. A Seattle actress takes to the stage in a cartoonish Native American costume as a way to educate people about cultural misappropriation. We’ll hear from performers who say they’re on the right side of donning what’s known as “redface”. Just what are the boundaries of Native American dress and imagery? Is it ever appropriate to wear traditional attire on stage?

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 – October Book of the Month: “A Is for Acorn: A California Indian ABC”
Lyn Risling (Karuk/Yurok/Hupa) and Analisa Tripp (Karuk) are introducing the world to Native American California culture through the pages of a children’s book, “A is for Acorn: A California Indian ABC.” Each letter of the English alphabet is connected to an aspect of Native culture, like B for basket-featuring designs similar to many of the tribes that call California home. Animals, plants and other cultural objects also get the highlight in this playful look at the ABC’s. We invite you to join us as we visit the book’s creators on our October Book of the Month feature.

Thursday, October 29, 2015 – October in the News
Republicans align with tribal sovereignty over oil drilling, more cities and states recognize Indigenous Peoples Day, and tribes seek a presidential declaration to protect land. These are among the recent news events we’ll analyze. Three Native journalists will join us with their insights on the stories that got their Native communities buzzing. What hot news item has got you talking?

Friday, October 30, 2015 – The “Indian Burial Ground” Trope
Halloween is nearly here and many TV shows are unearthing seasonal episodes with spooks and ghouls. One popular plot line is the “Indian burial ground” trope that usually includes characters becoming cursed or haunted because they unwittingly desecrate a Native American burial ground. Join us as we examine shows and movies that rely on exaggerated or just plain wrong interpretations of Native culture. Where did the fascination with Indian burial grounds come from? What are some other myths that movies perpetuate?

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of October 12 on Native America Calling

Monday, October 12, 2015 – Scary Storytelling
With Halloween just around the corner, we turn our attention to those tales of terror, those frightful fantasies: the scary story! From the Windigo to the Skinwalkers, each Nation has its own brand of frightening entertainments. In this hour, we will hear from three acclaimed Native storytellers, giving us tales to frighten and delight. We will discuss with them the art of the scary story and why they think scary stories are important.  What are scary stories you remember? What did you learn? How did the storyteller frighten you? Are Native scary stories the best? Do you have a scary story of your own to share?

Tuesday, October 13, 2015 – Sharing Stories of Recovery
For many, sharing their journey from addiction to sobriety is part of the recovery process. Addiction recovery refers to an ongoing commitment to sobriety. The Betty Ford Institute defines recovery as a “voluntarily maintained lifestyle … characterized by sobriety, personal health and citizenship.” What is the value of sharing your recovery story? Can sharing your journey help others? Is there a danger of dwelling too much in the past? If you would like to share your recovery story, email us at comments@nativeamericacalling.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015 – Photography in Native America
Photographs can be so much more than Instagram snapshots and Facebook posts. They tell stories, document our lives and preserve our memories. How is photography important to individuals, communities and tribes? When everyone with a cell phone can be a photographer, what makes good photography stand out? Why is it relevant in Native America? What stories are we telling through the camera lens?

Thursday, October 15, 2015 – Stop Wasting Food!
In the United Sttes 133 billion pounds or food-about 31 percent, of what’s produced-are wasted and tossed in the trash, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The USDA and the Environmental Protection Agency are teaming up with some charitable organizations and announced a first-ever goal to cut national food waste in half by 2030. Is food waste a big problem in Native America, even when it’s frowned upon in many tribal philosophies? Are there things you can do in your home and kitchen to reduce food waste?

Friday, October 16, 2015- Native Fitness
Glamor magazines and Hollywood movies help drive a desire to achieve a certain look: six-pack abs, flawless skin and cellulite-free thighs are often the popular image of the perfect body. But, Well for Culture founder Thosh Collins has started an innovative indigenous-based movement to redefine fitness. He believes in anchoring Native American values to staying healthy. We’ll hear from two founders of Well for Culture and their view that “strong tribal Nations are built by strong individuals.” They’ll talk about some dietary challenges Native Americans face, and the movement to relate Native culture to healthy living.

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

Week of October 5 on Native America Calling

Monday, October 5, 2015 – Assimilation in Native America
In September, on “The Laura Ingraham Show,” Republican presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said, “I think assimilation is an amazing thing. A good example of how even in our country, assimilation didn’t happen, and it’s been a disaster for the people, has been the Native American population on the reservations. If they were assimilated within a decade they’d probably be doing as well as the rest of us.”Do you agree or disagree with what Sen. Paul said? Is the discussion about assimilation more complex than Native Americans choosing to cast aside traditional culture and beliefs to join the dominate society? What does it mean to you to assimilate?

Tuesday, October, 6, 2015 – Fighting Forest Fires
Firefighters and forestry officials do several things to prevent forest fires, including managing the forest by clearing away fuel like dead trees and shrubs and carrying out prescribed burns. Today we learn who is managing forests and addressing wildfires in Indian Country. What’s the best way to manage wildfires? Are prescribed burns effective? How do fire officials makes choices while combating wildfires? What can we expect from wildfires in the future?

Wednesday, October 7, 2015 – Charity Drives
The holiday season is coming up. Charity drives often take place in the fall to help provide food and sometimes heat or other goods to help people get through the winter. In this hour, we discuss charity drives taking place around the country. Do families in your community rely on charity drives to get by? What makes a charity drive effective? How can people find out about nearby charity drives, either to contribute or receive? And are there cultural perceptions of charity in our society that impact our ability to help each other? If you’re organizing an event on your reservation or in your village, we want to hear what you are collecting and why.

Thursday, October 8, 2015 – Addiction Killing Tradition
Addiction can have a devastating impact on individuals and communities. From health to financial ruin, addiction has created devastating consequences for all those touched by this disease. Have you ever thought about how addiction affects our cultural and traditional practices in Native communities? Some local leaders are now using traditional practices and culture to help addicts recover and heal. Have you or a loved one turned to tradition to overcome addition? If addiction has had a negative impact on cultural practices in your community, what do you think it would take to make those traditions strong again?

Friday, October 9, 2015 – Chronic Pain
More than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, according to the Institute of Medicine. Chronic pain can be mild to excruciating pain that lasts for weeks, months or years. In this episode, we take a look at causes, treatments, drugs and addiction associated with chronic pain. We’ll also take a look at research currently being done at the University of Tulsa on Native Americans to see if they feel pain differently and whether or not they’re more susceptible to chronic pain. Are you or a family member affected by chronic pain? Do you think Native Americans experience pain and chronic pain differently?

Week of September 28 on Native America Calling

Monday, September 28, 2015 – Understanding Stroke  
A stroke is an event where blood flow is cut off from the brain and cells begin to die. Stroke is the seventh leading cause of death for American Indians and Alaska Natives, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nationwide, 1 in 20 deaths are a result of stroke.Today we learn about the signs of a stroke and important risk factors. Has someone in your family been affected by stroke?What questions do you have about strokes? Guests: Dr. Carolyn Badeer, a neurologist at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center.

Email your questions: comments@nativeamericacalling.com
Tuesday, September 29, 2015 – Defining Student Success 
We are now well into the school year and many students may have already taken tests in a variety of academic subjects. How do we know when that light bulb goes on and a student really gets it? Most K-12 students across the country take a series of standardized tests to measure their knowledge and skills. Teachers can also measure student knowledge through projects, class discussions and individual conversations. What do you think is the best way to measure student learning? The U.S. Department of Education recently granted the Miccosukee Indian School flexibility in defining Adequate Yearly Progress for their students.  How can schools measure student success from Indigenous perspective? Guests:
Paula Scott (Cherokee), curriculum coordinator at the Muckleshoot Tribal School and Walter Kahumoku III (Native Hawaiian), director of teacher education and  professional development (Kauhale Kipaipai) at the Kamehameha Schools.
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 – Book of the Month: “Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings” by Joy Harjo 
Mvskoke Nation artist Joy Harjo is known for her moving poetry. This month’s book spotlight is on her latest work “Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings,” which covers Native history and life. Knowing the important role that poets play in our societies, including bringing forth justice and helping to give vision, Joy follows suit with this collection of words that evoke images. We invite you to join us as we hear her observations on life during our September Book of the Month program.
Follow this conversation with the hashtag: #MvskokePoet
Thursday October 1, 2015 – Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Taking Care of the Caretaker 
For those families who are dealing with Alzheimer’s or dementia,having a caretaker can be very helpful. Caretakers must also make sure they are taking care of themselves as these illnesses can be stressful for the caretaker. Do you care for a family member with dementia? How do you cope with the challenges of caretaking? How can communities make sure caretakers are also being taken care of? Guests: Jordan Lewis (Aleut, Native Village of Naknek), assistant professor, University of Washington School of Social Work, Jan Dougherty from the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, and Lucinda Martin (Navajo), caregiver research specialist for Navajo Area Agency on Aging.
Friday, October 2,2015 – Change for the School Lunch Program? 
Members of Congress are currently considering the Child Nutrition Act, which comes up for re-authorization every five years. In 2010, Congress passed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which changed many aspects of child nutrition programs, including the National School Lunch Program. Now there’s room for change. Are you concerned about what your children are eating at school? Do you want to see changes made to school lunches, breakfasts and snacks? How will Native American children be affected after Congress makes a decision on the School Lunch Program? Guests: Mark Sorensen. CEO and co-founder of the STAR School and Jesse Padron (Oneida), food service director for the Oneida Nation School System.